Guinea election bringing old rivals to contesting again.who will win?

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After ten years in power, the 82-year-old Guinean president will hold a third term on Sunday, protesting tens of thousands of protesters who have taken to the streets in protest.

A former opposition leader who was once sentenced to death by a dictator, Alpha Conde is accused by critics of leaking the heat to plot to extend his power.In March, he reiterated a renewed constitution that said it would modernize the country, but his opponents plotted to occupy more than two-term presidential term limits.

“I fought for 45 years; I was the leader of the opposition, ”Conde, known for his small explosions, told French broadcasters this month. “My opponents are civil servants who became prime ministers after overthrowing the country. Surprisingly, I am considered an undemocratic dictator. ”

Conde faces his long-running political rival, Celeou Dalein Diallo, a junior and vocalist, on October 18.Dallo is now the opposition leader of the West African state, but he cut his teeth under the influential leader Lansana Conte, eventually rising to become prime minister.

The 68-year-old woman was at the forefront of protests against the third term in Conde, where soldiers seized her, leaving scores of people dead. Significantly, Diallo and Conde come from different backgrounds.Politics in a poor but rich resource-rich nation of 13 million people is largely racist.

President Conde’s Rally of the Guinea People (RPG) party is heavily supported by the Malinke people, and Diallo’s Union of Democratic Forces of Guinea (UFDG) by the Fulani people, though both insist they have many religious beliefs.Last week, the United Nations expressed shock at the growing hate speech during the election, warning that the situation was “extremely dangerous” and could lead to violence.

In a joint statement on October 7, UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet and Pramila Patten, acting special adviser to the international body on the prevention of genocide, accused “ongoing and widespread racist complaints” before voting.

They also urged candidates to “stop using provocative language that could lead to violence, discrimination and other human rights abuses”.

Sekou Toure sentenced Conde to death in 1970.He returned to the country in 1991, seven years after the death of the dictator, and contested the 1993 and 1998 presidential elections.

But his continued activism was seen as a threat by then-President Lansana Conte, who arrested him shortly after the 1998 election. Conde was then arrested.He eventually rose to the presidency in 2010, after defeating Dallo by a landslide.

In power, Conde wants to increase access to critical electricity in Guinea and rehabilitate troops, all in the wake of the Ebola epidemic that lasted from late 2013 to 2016.
Dallo is as good at dressing as Conde. He loves privately suited suits, often donating khaki jackets for the campaign campaign.

He is kind and political, and has recently received a string of references to his watch in public – to show that Conde’s term is coming to an end.Born into a large family in central Guinea in 1952, he attended both the Quranic and French schools before studying management in the capital, Conakry.

He then entered government under Sekou Toure, before moving to a major bank under Lansana Conte.
Diallo, who called himself a “technocrat”, held several ministerial positions under Conte before becoming Prime Minister in 2004.He was fired in 2006, but to his critics, Diallo remains an apparatchik showcasing the corruption of the Conte state.

Dallo became the head of the UFDG faction in 2007, where he has lived since then, witnessed the rift in the military that ousted Conte, and led the opposition party to Conde. Dallo was defeated in two by-elections in Conde, which he suspected were unfair. But he is confident he will win on Sunday, pointing to Conde’s “catastrophic record”. His decision to run for re-election is controversial among some of Guinea’s opposition supporters, who see his bid for the presidency as Conde’s endorsement.

But Dallo says he is in a hurry to run for a third term, and for some of his supporters, his vast experience in government benefits him.The opposition politician said during a press conference in Senegal last month that, now more than ever, he had learned the will to “win and hold on to success”.

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